Bridging Neoliberal Loneliness and Hippie Communes–A Role for Church? (Audio, Brueggemann 5)

The cat makes an appearance in this last video on Walter Brueggeman’s The Prophetic Imagination. I speculate on what a church would look like, and what it could do,if it re-imagined what it was for. I argue that churches and other religious institutions could be half-way houses between liberalism/capitalism and the dreaded and outdated hippie commune. … More Bridging Neoliberal Loneliness and Hippie Communes–A Role for Church? (Audio, Brueggemann 5)

Bridging Neoliberal Loneliness and Hippie Communes–A Role for Church? (Brueggemann 5)

The cat makes an appearance in this last video on Walter Brueggeman’s The Prophetic Imagination. I speculate on what a church would look like, and what it could do,if it re-imagined what it was for. I argue that churches and other religious institutions could be half-way houses between liberalism/capitalism and the dreaded and outdated hippie commune.

I’ll be moving on to McKenzie Wark’s book https://www.versobooks.com/books/3056-capital-is-dead
in the next video.
More Bridging Neoliberal Loneliness and Hippie Communes–A Role for Church? (Brueggemann 5)

Rethinking the Christian Contribution: Walter Brueggemann’s Imagination

I introduce some of theologian Walter Brueggemann’s themes in his classic “The Prophetic Imagination,” discussing some of the ways we can avail ourselves of a common narrative to try to gain some freedom against oppression, whether of the old-style Pharoah or the new version of less visible but very powerful economic and political forces that keep people working for an agenda they wouldn’t naturally choose. Through Brueggemann’s eyes, we are living in the imagination of “Royal consciousness” but we could be living in the imagination of God. What does this mean, not just for Christians, but generally for people who are trying to find some way to push back and gain some freedom? … More Rethinking the Christian Contribution: Walter Brueggemann’s Imagination

Unsafe and Alive in Zizek’s Post-Ideology (Dreaming Dangerously 5, audio)

I return to an interpretation of Zizek, The Year of Dreaming Dangerously, this time chapter 5: “Welcome to the Desert of Post-Ideology.” Zizek, through Lacan, distinguishes the controlled pleasures of capitalistic rationalism from the excessive enjoyment of the unsafe smoker and pointless rioter, and then evaluates what things like the UK riots of 2011 mean for advanced capitalism. … More Unsafe and Alive in Zizek’s Post-Ideology (Dreaming Dangerously 5, audio)

Not Jordan Peterson’s Carl Jung (A Reading From My New Book)

From Jung, After the Catastrophe: “Thanks to industrialization, large portions of the population were up-rooted and were herded together in large centres. This new form of existence—with its mass psychology and social dependence on the fluctuations of markets and wages—produced an individual who was unstable, insecure, and suggestible. He was aware that his life depended on boards of directors and captains of industry, and he supposed, rightly or wrongly, that they were chiefly motivated by financial interests. He knew that, no matter how conscientiously he worked, he could still fall a victim at any moment to economic changes which were utterly beyond his control. And there was nothing else for him to rely on.” … More Not Jordan Peterson’s Carl Jung (A Reading From My New Book)